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The Nuclear War Against Australia’s Aboriginal People

 

Australia’s nuclear industry has a shameful history of ‘radioactive racism’ that dates from the British bomb tests in the 1950s, writes Jim Green. The same attitudes have been evident in recent debates over uranium mines and nuclear waste, but Aboriginal peoples are fighting back!

“We will be still talking about our story in the communities up north so no one else has to go through this. We want to let the whole world know that we stood up very strong.”

The British government conducted 12 nuclear bomb tests in Australia in the 1950s, most of them at Maralinga in South Australia.

Permission was not sought from affected Aboriginal groups such as the Pitjantjatjara, Yankunytjatjara, Tjarutja and Kokatha.

Thousands of people were adversely affected and the impact on Aboriginal people was particularly profound.

Many Aboriginal people suffered from radiological poisoning. There are tragic accounts of families sleeping in the bomb craters. So-called ‘Native Patrol Officers’ patrolled thousands of square kilometres to try to ensure that Aboriginal people were removed before nuclear tests took place – with little success.

‘Ignorance, incompetence and cynicism’

The 1985 Royal Commission found that regard for Aboriginal safety was characterised by “ignorance, incompetence and cynicism”. Many Aboriginal people were forcibly removed from their homelands and taken to places such as the Yalata mission in South Australia, which was effectively a prison camp.

In the late-1990s, the Australian government carried out a clean-up of the Maralinga nuclear test site. It was done on the cheap and many tonnes of debris contaminated with kilograms of plutonium remain buried in shallow, unlined pits in totally unsuitable geology.

As nuclear engineer and whistleblower Alan Parkinson said of the ‘clean-up’ on ABC radio in August 2002: “What was done at Maralinga was a cheap and nasty solution that wouldn’t be adopted on white-fellas land.”

Barely a decade after the ‘clean-up’, a survey revealed that 19 of the 85 contaminated debris pits had been subject to erosion or subsidence. The half-life of plutonium-239 is 24,100 years.

Despite the residual contamination, the Australian government off-loaded responsibility for the land onto the Maralinga Tjarutja Traditional Owners.

The government portrayed this land transfer as an act of reconciliation, but the real agenda was spelt out in a 1996 government document which states that the ‘clean-up’ was “aimed at reducing Commonwealth liability arising from residual contamination.”

Radioactive ransom – dumping on the Northern Territory

Since 2006 successive federal governments have been attempting to establish a nuclear waste dump at Muckaty, 110 km north of Tennant Creek in the Northern Territory.

A toxic trade-off of basic services for a radioactive waste dump has been part of this story from the start. The nomination of the Muckaty site was made with the promise of $12 million compensation package comprising roads, houses and scholarships.

Muckaty Traditional Owner Kylie Sambo objected to this radioactive ransom: “I think that is a very, very stupid idea for us to sell our land to get better education and scholarships. As an Australian we should be already entitled to that.”

While a small group of Traditional Owners supported the dump, a large majority were opposed and some initiated legal action in the Federal Court challenging the nomination of the Muckaty site by the federal government and the Northern Land Council (NLC).

The politics is no less dirty

The Liberal / National Coalition government led by John Howard passed legislation – the Commonwealth Radioactive Waste Management Act 2005 – overriding the Aboriginal Heritage Act, undermining the Aboriginal Land Rights Act, and allowing the imposition of a nuclear dump with no Aboriginal consultation or consent.

“Practical reconciliation” was the Howard government’s mantra – in practice this meant crude, populist, dog-whistle racism – as detailed in John Pilger’s latest film, Utopia.

The Australian Labor Party voted against the Commonwealth Radioactive Waste Management Act, with Labor parliamentarians describing it as “extreme”, “arrogant”, “draconian”, “sorry”, “sordid”, and “profoundly shameful”. At its 2007 national conference, Labor voted unanimously to repeal the legislation.

Yet after the 2007 election, the Labor government passed legislation – the National Radioactive Waste Management Act (NRWMA) – which was almost as draconian and still permitted the imposition of a nuclear dump with no Aboriginal consultation or consent. Hooray for hypocrisy!

In February 2008, Labor Prime Minister Kevin Rudd highlighted the life-story of Lorna Fejo – a member of the stolen generation – in the National Apology in Parliament House. At the same time, the Rudd government was stealing her land for a nuclear dump. Fejo said:

“I’m very, very disappointed and downhearted about that. I’m really sad. The thing is – when are we going to have a fair go? Australia is supposed to be the land of the fair go. When are we going to have fair go? I’ve been stolen from my mother and now they’re stealing my land off me.”

Shamefully, the NLC supported legislation disempowering the people it is meant to represent.

Aboriginal owners savour a rare victory

Muckaty Traditional Owners were determined to stop the dump and they have been supported by the Beyond Nuclear Initiative; a pro bono legal team led by legal firm Maurice Blackburn; the Australian Nuclear Free Alliance; key trade unions including the Australian Council of Trade Unions; church groups; medical and public health organisations; local councils; the Australian Greens; and environment groups such as Friends of the Earth, the Australian Conservation Foundation and the Environment Centre NT.

The Federal Court trial finally began in June 2014. After two weeks of evidence, the NLC gave up and agreed to recommend to the federal government the withdrawal of the nomination of Muckaty for a nuclear dump.

The Coalition government led by Prime Minister Tony Abbott accepted the NLC’s recommendation. Abbott – who describes himself as the political love-child of John Howard might have been called to appear at the trial had it continued.

As a result of their surrender, the NLC and the government did not have to face cross-examination in relation to numerous serious accusations raised in the first two weeks of the trial – including claims that the NLC rewrote an anthropologists’ report.

“I believe [the NLC] didn’t want to go through that humiliation of what they really done. But it’s better now that they actually backed off. It’s good for us.”
Kylie Sambo

“I feel ecstatic. I feel free because it was a long struggle to protect my land.”
Lorna Fejo

“Today will go down in the history books of Indigenous Australia on par with the Wave Hill Walk-off, Maboand Blue Mud Bay. We have shown the Commonwealth and the NLC that we will stand strong for this country. The NLC tried to divide and conquer us but they did not succeed.”
Marlene Nungarrayi Bennett

“We will be still talking about our story in the communities up north so no one else has to go through this. We want to let the whole world know that we stood up very strong. We want to thank the supporters around the world that stood behind us and made us feel strong.”
Dianne Stokes

Dumping on South Australia

The failed attempt to establish a dump at Muckaty followed the failed attempt to establish a dump in South Australia. In 1998, the Howard government announced its intention to build a nuclear waste dump near Woomera in South Australia.

Leading the battle against the dump were the Kupa Piti Kungka Tjuta, a council of senior Aboriginal women from northern SA. Many of the Kungkas personally suffered the impacts of the British nuclear bomb tests at Maralinga and Emu in the 1950s.

The proposed dump generated such controversy in SA that the federal government hired a public relations company. Correspondence between the company and the government was released under Freedom of Information laws.

In one exchange, a government official asked the PR company to remove sand-dunes from a photo to be used in a brochure. The explanation provided by the government official was that: “Dunes are a sensitive area with respect to Aboriginal Heritage”.

The sand-dunes were removed from the photo, only for the government official to ask if the horizon could be straightened up as well. ‘Terra nullius’!

In 2003, the federal government used the Lands Acquisition Act 1989 to seize land for the dump. Native Title rights and interests were extinguished with the stroke of a pen. This took place with no forewarning and no consultation with Aboriginal people.

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About hopegirl2012

Naima Feagin (HopeGirl) holds an MBA and a variety of business experience in corporate and government finance and small business entrepreneurship. In 2012, she left the corporate world to build an online business through blogging, marketing, teaching and a passion for humanitarian projects. In 2014 her stepfather designed and open sourced a free energy generator prototype. She traveled around the world building free energy prototypes and growing her online business. This is also when she met her partner Tivon. She has played a large role as a public spokesperson for her family’s free energy project. Hope and Tivon also sponsor a local community center for women and children. They are both American ex-pats that live and work together in Morocco.

Discussion

2 thoughts on “The Nuclear War Against Australia’s Aboriginal People

  1. All these matters will need to be addressed asap in People’s Courts; go to http://www.itnj.org for more info; in peace

    Posted by Giftoftruth | August 27, 2015, 5:14 pm
  2. Keshefoundation.org has given people of the Earth the means to eliminate radiation by nano coating any kind of metal. The process is simple enough. You repeatedly put the metal into a fire (wood, propane, natural gas etc) and bring it to red hot, remove, let cool, then place back into the fire. Do this 5 times. The resulting nano coating (black stuff on the metal) attracts and sequesters the radioactive stuff in the environment. By tossing nano coated metals around the area in which you live will effectively eliminate residual radiation from that space. You would replace the nano coated metals once a year. Send the saturated radioactive nano metals to the nuclear authority in your country for disposal. This is how farmers near Fukushima are able to grow their crops without radiation poisoning. Also, simple Orgonite will work continuously to transmute radioactive stuff into positive orgone energy and you don’t need to replace it. orgonite.info is a great resource to learn how to create these devices yourself. Be sure to add a small piece of Citrine quartz to the mix, or I have some for sale on sacredintuitiveelements.com. Hugs n love to all.

    Posted by Eddie | August 27, 2015, 7:18 pm
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